Alexander Yulikov in front of his works at the exhibition at the House of Culture at VDNH, Moscow, in 1975.     
© Photo by Valentin Serov

Alexander Yulikov was born in 1943 in the village of Vyatskye Polyany in the Kirov region where his family was evacuated during World War II. 

   In 1954-1961 Yulikov studied at the Moscow Middle School of Fine Arts under the USSR Academy of Arts. 

   In 1961-1966 - at the Stroganov School of Arts and Industrial Design. Alexander completed his education at the Moscow Polygraphic Institute in 1969.

   In 1969, the artist became a member of the Moscow Committee of Graphic Artists. He joined the Moscow Union of Artists in 1986 but was quickly expelled on the grounds of "ideological subversion." His membership was restored in 1989.

Yulikov has been participating in exhibitions since 1968. 

Among his solo exhibits are:

 

  • Shearing happening at the studio of Leonid Sokov in Moscow in 1976; 

  • 100 Sheets at the House of Medics in Moscow in 1987; 

  • Drawings at the UN headquarters in New York, USA in 1989; 

  • Paintings at the Bronda Gallery in Helsinki, Finland in 1989; 

  • Paintings at the House of Soviet Immigrants in Jerusalem, Israel in 1990; 

  • Project at the Velta gallery in Moscow in 1993; 

  • Shapes in the Velta gallery in Moscow in 1995; 

  • Paintings in the Karenina Gallery in Moscow in 2006; 

  • Alexander Yulikov at the National Center for Contemporary Arts in Moscow in 2008;

  • Alexander Yulikov at the National Center for Contemporary Arts in Moscow in 2013;

  • Alexander Yulikov. Post-Suprematism at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art in 2017

 

Alexander's works are found in the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, the State Russian Museum in St. Petersburg, Ludwig Forum for International Art in Aachen, Germany, The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick, NJ, USA, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY, USA; Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and other collections around the world.

In January 2020, Alexander Yulikov received a Grant-Award from The Barnett and Annalee Newman Foundation for embodying the spirit of individualism and independence that Barnett Newman exhibited throughout his own career.